Climate change is the defining issue of our times. It provides the context and motivation for our work.

Defending nature

Nature needs time and space to adapt as climate change disrupts species and ecosystems. We work to protect B.C.’s forests, watersheds and at-risk species to prepare for climatic shifts already underway. Read more about our campaigns in the Flathead River Valley, the Great Bear Rainforest, and Vancouver Island and the south coast.

Climate change also threatens our agricultural production and the feasibility of relying on global food distribution. Read more about our campaign to protect Peace River Valley agricultural land and wildlife habitat threatened by the Site C megadam.

Stabilizing our climate

The science tells us that, to have any chance of keeping global warming below 2⁰C, 80 per cent of the world’s fossil fuels must stay in the ground.

Read more about our campaigns against the Kinder Morgan pipeline and tanker proposal as well as our work on the Petronas fracked gas plant and other LNG projects.

Climate action

We work to support both government and B.C. communities to take meaningful climate action. Learn about our climate solutions campaigning and read The Future Is Here, our ten-point plan for post-carbon prosperity in B.C.

Do you want to get more involved in the movement to save B.C.’s wild places and stop climate polluting fossil fuel projects? Do you share our love of nature? Do you want to have fun and meet like-minded people?


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Help us inspire generations to defend nature and confront climate change, so families, communities and the natural world can prosper together.

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Recent Updates

The forest action taker's guide

If you know what’s happening to Vancouver Island's ancient old-growth rainforests and you want to do more than send a letter, this blog is for you.

On Clayoquot Sound anniversary, Sierra Club BC map shows more than 30 per cent of Vancouver Island’s remaining old-growth rainforest destroyed since protests

While many of BC’s trees are going up in flames, the most resilient provincial forests that are less prone to fire – intact old-growth rainforests – continue to be clearcut in most parts of the province. On the twenty-fifth anniversary of the historic Clayoquot Sound mass arrest, a new Sierra Club BC map and data show more than thirty per cent of Vancouver Island’s remaining productive old-growth rainforest in 1993 was destroyed in just the last twenty-five years.

Victoria Ecotourism Outfitter and Environmental Advocates Invite Trudeaus to Bear Witness to Orcas’ Wake

On July 24 marine biologists observed a member of the endangered Salish Sea orcas, known as J35 or Tahlequah, swimming around carrying her dead newborn calf on her back. In an effort to hold Trudeau accountable as a decision maker, Friends of Clayoquot Sound reached out to the South Island ecotourism operator, Ocean Ecoventures, to invite the Trudeaus on a reality tour to bear witness to the orcas’ mournful wake.