fbpx

Black Huckleberry (Big Huckleberry)

Vaccinium membranaceum

Photo: Nancy Turner

Black Huckleberry

APPEARANCE

The black huckleberry is a deciduous shrub that grows to one and half metres tall and has finely toothed leaves that turn purple in the fall. They have small yellow or pinkish flowers in spring that ripen into large purple-black berries. The berries taste great and are eaten by many birds and mammals.

RANGE & HABITAT

Black huckleberries are common throughout B.C., especially in the Central Interior. They like to live in woodland areas with some shade, and often grow in large patches. This plant is found in the Central Interior and Southern Interior Mountains ecoprovinces.

LIFE CYCLE

They produce the most delicious berries of the huckleberry family in midsummer. New plants grow from spreading underground stems.

ANIMAL USES

Birds, bears and small mammals eat the berries.

TRADITIONAL FIRST NATIONS USES

The berries can be eaten fresh, dried or stored in grease.

MODERN USES

The berries can be eaten fresh and frozen and are also available canned.

STATUS

COSEWIC: Not at Risk
CDC: Yellow

MORE INFORMATION

www.people.duke.edu

Photo: Steven G Johnson