Western Red Cedar

Thuja plicata

Photo: Nancy Turner

Western Red Cedar

APPEARANCE

The red cedar grows up to 60 metres tall and has drooping branches and a large trunk that spreads out at the base. Its needles are scale-like with a strong smell; the bark is stringy and can be torn off in long strips.

RANGE & HABITAT

Western red cedar grows in Oregon, Washington and B.C. along the coast and in interior wet areas. In B.C., the yellow cedar grows in the Coast and Mountains, Georgia Lowlands and Southern Interior Mountains ecoprovinces.

LIFE CYCLE

The tree has extremely rot and insect resistant wood; it can last hundreds of years! The oldest red cedars have been over 1,000 years old. New cedars sprout in damp, rich soil or old wood, and the old trees turn into “nurse trees” when they die and fall over.

ANIMAL USES

Bears and other animals use old hollow red cedar trees for winter dens.

TRADITIONAL FIRST NATIONS USES

The wood was used to build canoes, houses, boxes, totem poles, tools, paddles. The bark of the tree was used in making mats, clothing, baskets, nets, fishing lines, and medicines.

MODERN USES

Cedar wood is used for house siding, walls & roofing, fencing, furniture and making musical instruments.

STATUS

COSEWIC: Not at Risk
CDC: Yellow

MORE INFORMATION

www.bcadventure.com

Photo: Paula Steele