About our education programs

Since 1998, Sierra Club B.C’s Education program has provided curriculum-based, outdoor-based nature experiences for 125,000 students and teachers across the province of British Columbia. By directly engaging with local natural environments and centring diverse ecological and traditional knowledges, we offer hands-on activities and experiential learning opportunities that foster healthy childhood development and cultivate environmental sustainability.

We incorporate an approach that is:

  • Nature-Based and Hands-On
  • Inquiry-Based
  • Intersectional and Cross-Curricular (aligned with the new Ministry of Education curriculum)
  • Informed by First Peoples’ Principles of Learning
  • Place-Based
  • Rooted in the principle that connecting with nature is a core aspect of environmental stewardship

Our programs are available in any community in British Columbia.



We rely on donations to keep our programs free, accessible, and inclusive year after year. Please donate today to ensure they can stay this way.







Recent Updates

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Ten tips for successful outdoor learning

As teachers we know that nature provides a more stimulating learning environment than the standard four-walled classroom, so why are we still stuck inside? With this question in mind, our Education Team has compiled a list of tips to help you feel more comfortable taking your own class outdoors.
Willows Elementary. Photo by C. Lyon.
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Going Wild! Nature and Play

Going Wild! Nature and Play was designed to get kindergarten students engaged and excited about nature in their own school community. What better way than to facilitate a program that allows students to explore through touching, smelling, looking and listening to unique nature items such as deer jaw bones, moon snails, bracket fungus and local native plants.
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Deep nature connection in the modern world: Coyote Mentoring

There are two worlds: the modern world of science and technology, and the ancient world where we use our wild instincts to survive and understand what is happening around us. It's time to ignite our wild instincts once again.
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Why Our Children Need to Get Outside and Engage with Nature

Children spend less and less time in contact with the natural world and this is having a huge impact on their health and development.

Gratefully supported by:

 
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We acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia.