, , , ,

Why Our Children Need to Get Outside and Engage with Nature

Children spend less and less time in contact with the natural world and this is having a huge impact on their health and development.
, ,

The Value of Place-Based Education

If you have ever moved or traveled to another place in the world, you understand what it means to be connected to place.
, ,

SIERRA OKANAGAN GETS OUTSIDE WITH LOCAL SCHOOL

Sierra Okanagan has been working on some exciting programs! In September 2016, they partnered with the Okanagan Collaborative Conservation Program (OCCP) on the Students Without Borders Academy at Kalamalka Secondary.
, ,

Connecting with Vitamin N: A Ten-Year Reflection from One of Canada’s Leading Conservationists

When I read that Richard Louv had published Vitamin N: The Essential Guide to a Nature-Rich Life, it caused me to pause and reflect on my history with the child and nature movement.
,

My Experience Volunteering with Sierra Club BC

I really enjoyed the time I spent volunteering with Sierra Club BC Environmental Educator Kirsten Dallimore. It was great to see an experienced environmental educator in action.
, ,

Giants of the Salish Sea: Humpback whales

Standing at Clover Point and looking out into the Salish Sea, it’s hard to believe there are giants swimming just off in the distance: humpback whales.
, ,

Celebrating another year of environmental education in BC

Wow! What a great school year! From Quesnel and Victoria to Surrey and Vernon, our Education Team delivered nature education at schools all across the province. Together, we are fostering healthier children and a healthier planet.
Bear eating berries
, ,

ECOSYSTEM 101: Bears, Berries and Bees

The relationship between bears, huckleberries and bees is both straightforward and simple. Bees pollinate flowers, flowers make berries, bears eat berries. Seems simple enough. But is it?
Huckleberry flowers
, ,

SPECIES STORY: Black Huckleberry

Through the summer, bright red berries hang like jewels from the shrub's delicate branches. The berries beckon to all who pass—feather or fur—and deliver a punch of sweet and sour flavour.
vaccinium membranaceum
, ,

FUN FACTS: What's in a name?

Did you know that well over 50 languages are spoken in B.C., including over 40 First Nations languages? With that much language diversity, one can guess that something as common as a huckleberry might go by many different names.