Another Adventuresome Year

Environmental educator, Kirsten Dallimore shares her favourite tips for getting students and children into nature.

Connections in the Peace

As I stood on the shores of the Peace River in Northern BC this past spring, I was reminded of the incredible diversity of land and water we hold here in beautiful BC. Our children and future generations deserve to experience all of this amazing biodiversity. They deserve to know where they live and develop a connection to the place they call home.

Climate and Place: The Future is Here

Our new pilot program, “Climate and Place: The Future is Here,” is designed for middle school students in Grades 6-8. In this workshop, students collaborate together to learn more about climate change solutions. It is based on Sierra Club BC’s vision document The Future is Here.

Earth Day Challenge: Get outside and PLAY!

Earth Week is a time to celebrate and join together to work toward sustaining and building healthy and vibrant communities. This year I invite every class to take part in a challenge to get outside and PLAY!

Deep nature connection in the modern world: Coyote Mentoring

There are two worlds: the modern world of science and technology, and the ancient world where we use our wild instincts to survive and understand what is happening around us. It's time to ignite our wild instincts once again.

Take your adventures outside this Spring Break!

Looking to get the kids outdoors and into nature over the spring break? Interested in joining a group of like-minded kids and families? Check out my recommendations for keeping nature-connected and learning something new this spring break.

My favourite environmental children's books

One of my favorite things to do with a class is to read them a story. I use stories as a way to introduce myself and to share an important key message about nature and our connection as people to nature. Stories enable children to get hooked and become engaged in a program.

Going Wild! Nature and Play

Going Wild! Nature and Play was designed to get kindergarten students engaged and excited about nature in their own school community. What better way than to facilitate a program that allows students to explore through touching, smelling, looking and listening to unique nature items such as deer jaw bones, moon snails, bracket fungus and local native plants.

The Value of Place-Based Education

If you have ever moved or traveled to another place in the world, you understand what it means to be connected to place.
Education program at John Muir in Sooke

A day in the life of an environmental educator

Last week I had the amazing opportunity to travel to Sooke and teach students at both John Muir Elementary School and École Poirier Elementary School. I wanted to share some stories about my experience teaching these kids out in nature.